Archive for the ‘Internet Kenya’ Category

FOA Certified Fiber Optic (Technical) Course

 

Invitation to participate: FOA Certified Fiber Optic (Technical) Course, 29th November to 2nd December 2011, at African eDevelopment Resource Centre Nairobi, Kenya.

African eDevelopment Resource Centre (AeRC) is an organization that champions ICT for capacity development initiatives in the region through knowledge sharing and skill development programmes.  We would like to invite you to a 4 day unique, authoritative, high-value, hands-on practical Fiber Optics course which will provide participants with essential skills and knowledge necessary to design, install, splice, connectorize, troubleshoot and test fiber optic systems.

  • Dates: 29th November – 2nd December 2011
  • Venue: eDevelopment House, 604 Limuru Road, Old Muthaiga, Nairobi, Kenya
  • Fee: US$ 1,630 per participant exclusive of VAT

About Certified Fiber Optics Technician (CFOT)

In today’s high tech world, certification is considered proof of professional status and is often required for jobs.  Students will be eligible to write the FOA (Fiber Optic Association) exam after completing the course. Successful students will receive the Certified Fiber Optics Technician (CFOT) accreditation, which includes a CFOT passport.

The FOA maintains a worldwide database of fiber optic installers, contractors and consultants as a resource for those searching for a designer or installer for fiber optic projects or trained employees. The database is searchable by location and fiber optic specialty. As of the end of 2006, over 20,000 CFOT’s have been certified through training at over 135 schools worldwide. The FOA is the most recognized certification in fiber optics in the world.

Who should attend?

Previous experience in this field of fiber optics is necessary. This training program is not limited to installers or technicians, it is an excellent credential for sales and marketing personnel, indicating their comprehensive knowledge of the industry and building confidence in their assistance to their customers.

Learning outcomes

This is a comprehensive, integrated training program which covers all aspects of both local and wide area optical networks to make sure that our students are fully prepared and employable. Optical fiber installation, splicing, connectorization, troubleshooting, acceptance testing and much more are taught with extensive hands-on practice.  Also covered is the use of transceivers, switching gear, splice enclosure hardware, and procedures pertaining to installing and testing them.

Click to Download Course Outline

Regards,

Kindest regards,

James Ngatia | Business Development Manager


Africa’s leading Consulting and Training partner in ICT and Telecommunications

D.I.T Registration No. DIT/TRN 705

eDevelopment House, 604, Limuru Road, Old Muthaiga

(+254-20-4041646/47/57 : :  M: +254 726 582828 or +254 738 818283 : : Skype name: james.ngatia

Visit our website www.africanedevelopment.org for the latest catalogs, eBooks and white papers

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Certified Fiber Optic Training Course, 10-13 August 2010, eDevelopment Centre – Nairobi, Kenya

Invitation: Certified Fiber Optic Training Course, 10-13 August 2010, eDevelopment Centre – Nairobi, Kenya.

African eDevelopment Resource Center (AeRC) in collaboration with 3 Triple Play Fibre Optic Solutions would like to invite delegates to a 4 day unique, authoritative, high-value, hands-on practical course which will provide participants with essential skills and knowledge necessary to design, install, splice, connectorize, troubleshoot and test fiber optic systems.

AeRC is a not-for-profit organization championing ICT for capacity development initiatives in the region through knowledge sharing and skills development programmes. Formed in 2005, 3 Triple Play Fibre Optic Solutions based in South Africa is an organisation that specialises in installation and training in Fibre Optic Systems.

In today’s high tech world, certification is considered proof of professional status and is often required for jobs 3 Triple Play Fiber Optic Solutions is an approved training centre for the Fiber Optic Association Inc. (FOA). http://www.thefoa.org. Students will be eligible to write the FOA exam after completing the course. Successful students will receive the Certified Fiber Optics Technician (CFOT) accreditation, which includes a CFOT passport.

The FOA maintains a worldwide database of fiber optic installers, contractors and consultants as a resource for those searching for a designer or installer for fiber optic projects or trained employees. The database is searchable by location and fiber optic specialty.

As of the end of 2006, over 20,000 CFOT’s have been certified through training at over 135 schools worldwide. The FOA is the most recognized certification in fiber optics in the world.

Our Instructors

A number of instructors in this program are experienced academics from the University of KwaZulu-Natal with considerable theoretical backgrounds as well as extensive industrial experience related to fiber optic technology. (View the course outline below for more Details on the Lead Trainer).

Who should attend

This training program is not limited to installers or technicians, it is an excellent credential for sales and marketing personnel, indicating their comprehensive knowledge of the industry and building confidence in their assistance to their customers.

What will you learn

This is a comprehensive, integrated training program which covers all aspects of both local and wide area optical networks to make sure that our students are fully prepared and employable. Optical fiber installation, splicing, connectorization, troubleshooting, acceptance testing and much more are taught with extensive hands-on practice.

Also covered is the use of transceivers, switching gear, splice enclosure hardware, and procedures pertaining to installing and testing them.

Registration Fee

The registration fee for the workshop is US$1630 + 16 % VAT which will cover all the documentation, administration and meals during the workshop. To participate in this workshop, please fill out the attached registration form and return it to the email indicated. Due to the nature of the course we have a limited number of spaces available and will be allocated on a first-come-first-served basis.

Please find the links to download the Course Outline and Registration Form.

Prescribed Text for the Course will be provided upon registration:

We look forward to be of service to you should you need more information on the Course.

Regards,

Macharia Celestine

African eDevelopment Resource Centre
eDevelopment House : : 604 Limuru Road
Old Muthaiga : : P O Box 49475 00100
Nairobi : : Kenya
Landline +254 20 3741646/7 : : Cell +254 722 284 328
Training : : Research : : Consultancy : Publishing

2010 Capacity Building Opportunities:

  • VSAT Field Engineering: 7-9 July (Kenya)
  • GIS Disaster Management: 14-16 July(Kenya)
  • Knowledge Management Course: 21-23 July (Kenya)
  • Enterprise Resource Planning: 28-30 July (Kenya)
  • Certified Fibre Optic Technician: 10-13 August (Kenya)
  • Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL): 18-20 August (Kenya)
  • Satellite Communications Systems: 25-27 August (Kenya)
  • Mini-MBA in Telecoms: 6-9 September (Kenya)

Book Now, Limited spaces available.

Kenyan Student Googles Herself To An International Award

Shikoh Gitau, a Kenyan PhD student in the University of Cape Town, Department of Computer Science, has bagged the prestigious Google Anita Borg Memorial Award for 2010, the first recipient from sub-Saharan Africa.

The award is given to female students who show exceptional academic and leadership skills in computing and technology. The award carries a cash prize and a visit to Google’s Engineering Centre in Zurich for a networking retreat.

Read more here on the UCT website

Fibre Optic Cables and Internet Bandwidth in Kenya : The Basics, part II

As discussed in part I, Kenya and the East African countries, recently joined the rest of the world in high speed, limitless bandwidth connection. This is thanks to the sub-marine fibre optic cables landed at Mombasa. So the BIG question that arose, was, now what? Or so what?

In the digital global village, high speed connectivity heralds a new dawn, hitherto not possible due to the limited capacity connections we had. New breakthroughs emerge as the world is able to communicate in a faster and more reliable way, thanks to the technology now available. The technology itself is not new, but the availability is.

For a growing economy like ours, there are myriad ways we can cruise into this new information super highway, and lift ourselves and the standards of our living. I cannot even begin to exhaustively cover what is possible due to the connections we now have, its is too broad a subject. I shall endeavour to narrow it down to what I think is relevant for the Kenya of today.

The knowledge economy driven by digital erasing of geographical and intellectual boundaries, is ours to take. We can leapfrog other economies by adapting ourselves to the new world that is now knocking. We can create new industries, new jobs, increase our industrial and agricultural capacity all using this new age technology. We can improve our academics in schools and universities, tapping into knowledge bases in far off countries. Our doctors can collaborate with colleagues across the globe and deliver better health care.

Our governemnt can take services online and enable its “customers” efficiently transact and consume services better. We can sell our farm produce in far off markets from the comfort of our farm houses. There is no limit to what we can do.

Specifically;

1. Applications Development – Software developers are having a field day. The new connectivity is bringing in lots of possibilities to create, test and deploy new software. Web applications, mobile applications, and freelancing are all happening at the speed of light. They have access to immense databases of source code, the DNA that software is made of. This access at high speeds means they can adapt the source code for our specific needs. This shortens the software development life cycle. They can collaborate with like-minded individuals across the globe and enhance their skills. The possibilities here are limitless. Is anyone taking advantage?

2. Outsourcing – There are tremendous opportunities in business process outsourcing, popularly known as BPO. This is where specialist companies are formed to take over the non-core, back office work of other corporations. This leaves the BPO’s customers to concentrate on their core businesses. The possibilities here are only limited to our innovation and industriousness. Other business opportunities lie in contact centres. Recently several of the mobile network operators have outsourced their customer care business to contact centres. This leaves them to manage their core business. Other opportunities lie in cloud computing, Software-as-a-Service, Platform-as-a-Service, Infrastructure-as-a-Service, data centres, and dedicated, ICT-centric free economic zones (FEZs) and software technology parks (STPs). The technology, know how, financing, skilled manpower are all available. We however, need proper enabling legislation to propel these new age business. Then entrepreneurs can step in and start their ventures.

3. Academics – An initiative based at Kenyatta University known as Africa Virtual University is laudable. Using high speed links, there has been academic collaboration across the continent. The bandwidth now available should enhance this venture further. Whole digital libraries are now available. The largest library on earth, the US Library of Congress has a mind-boggling digital collection, and can be accessed by any authorized person with a computer and high-speed internet connection. We can also digitise our volumes and have them accessed by other people. Academic video on demand, streaming video from content servers strewn across the globe, live video feed from lectures or class sessions across the globe are all distinct possibilities. The only limit, our speed of adapting to these possibilities. Other countries are not waiting.

4. Business and Trade – Trade and commerce enters a whole new dimension. New markets, research, bidding and competition are enabled in ways we have never seen before. E-commerce is on the rise. A distinct attraction is SMEs face low barriers to entry into the word of e-commerce. Business alliances are being formed electronically across the globe, and new markets open up daily.

5. Government – With e-government initiatives, efficient services, higher revenue collection, rapid results can be achieved at low cost. Kenya Revenue Authority’s initiatives in this area are a case in point. It is commendable that there is genuine work in this direction for various governemnt departments. Video conferencing can drastically reduce travel costs and achieve more efficient meetings. We need to study how other governments have done it.

6. Telecommuting – This woud have the most significant effect on socio-economic progress in our country. As rural-urban migration puts pressure on resources in cities the pressure is on. Telecommuting can cut down wastage in non-essential travel, better utilization of time and skills, multi-tasking, use of video-conferencing for meetings, collaborative webinars, conference calls… the list is endless. We need new labour laws, we need to re-think the whole work scene. People should be able to work from anywhere they can connect, so long as their work does not need physical presence at their work place.

I have just scratched the surface above, and the list can go on and on. We need new work ethic, innopvate new ideas, get the legislature to enact new laws to ensure smooth working of the new digital age economy.

In part III, we discuss the flip side. Risks, security, theft, moral decadence, criminal activities….Yes all these come hand in hand with the sweet revolution. Every sweet smelling rose comes with thorns, I think.

Let me have your feedback below.

Fibre Optic Cables and Internet Bandwidth in Kenya : The Basics, part I

This is fibre optic cables 101. The basics, introduction, definitely not for the experts. Read on if you are, or not.

I always use the analogy of a water pipe to try and describe the much-talked about fibre optic cables and bandwidth. It is until we understand what the basics are, that we can begin to get a clue on what the fuss is all about. Then we shall fully embrace the potential that we are sitting on as a country.

Imagine we have water pipes running from a fresh water well to our homes. The well has an inexhaustible supply of water, so the only limit to the quantity of water flowing into your home is the size of the pipe delivering the water. You are at liberty to connect a pipe(s) of whatever size, depending on your needs and ability. The size or quantity of the pipes used do not matter, the well cannot run out of water. Also understand that the need for water in your home is essential, whatever the you use it for.

In the Kenya of yester years, we had “small, limited capacity” pipes to connect us to the rest of the world (or well). These pipes carried data (or Internet) and voice traffic from Kenya to the well. The pipes were used to take care of all bi-directional traffic into/out of Kenya. The “pipe capacity” is what is called “bandwidth”, and in the past we used satellites (or small, limited capacity pipes) to connect us to the world (or the well as described above).

After alot of twiddling of fingers, hand wringing, foot dragging and general indecison, we managed to lay bigger “pipes” from Mombasa to various parts of the world, by inter-connecting with existing bigger “pipes” regionally.

The only thing that has changed is now we have bigger capacity pipes (called sub-marine or undersea fibre optic cables) from three suppliers, i.e. Seacom, TEAMS and Eassy. All these bandwidth suppliers are selling their bandwidth capacity to resellers, called Internet Service providers (or ISPs). The ISPs then further resell the bandwidth to you and me, the consumer. Do not worry about the complex technology connecting you and the world, that is not important, for now.

Note: They are called “submarine” or “undersea” cables because from Mombasa the cables are laid on the seabed all the way to the inter-connection points farther afield.

The immediate effect of this limitless capacity is we should now, theoretically, be able to have faster and cheaper connections to the world. Our international voice calls should be clearer, without static or the annoying delay. Our Internet experience should be richer, faster and we should be able to access bandwidth-intensive applications like streaming video with no delay. Downloads should be faster, saving us time and money. Uploads should be faster, saving us time and money. Anything interactive, like video-conferencing, should be a breeze.

NOTE: I keep saying “should”, because the reality for you and me may not be any different from the recent past.

OK, now you ask, so what? What is the big deal? Why all the fuss? So what if we have superb speeds due to the limitless bandwidth? How does this change my life, or yours? How does it change my grandmother’s life, back in my village? How does it change the small or the big commercial farmer’s life? Or the student, or politician, or small or big business owner? Or the matatu owner, or priest in your church? Or the government hospital or the goverment? Now that we have an almost limitless bandwidth capacity, what does it really mean for the ordinary Internet user like you and me?

Will this capacity create jobs? Change the economy? How? When? What has been the impact / experience in other countries? Could this be another over-hyped technological farce?

Worry not, I will hold your hand and walk you through this. This will form part II of our discussion.

Let me have your feedback below.

Free Internet Until Jan 4th, from KDN Butterfly

The nabobs that be at Parkside Towers, KDN HQ, looked across the city scape, and said, let us give them free Internet until 4th Jan. So KDN is extending their Butterfly service for free as a year end bonus for 2009. They are hoping you will remember this gesture of goodwill and sign up for their service, if you haven’t already.

My only wish is that the KDN Customer Scare, sorry, Customer Care nabobs can look across the city scape and say, let us offer them the best customer experience, let us create stark-raving mad evangelists from our customers, let us make them so happy, they will shed tears of utter joy, let us organize our Customer Service machinery and indeed the entire organization, to serve them best, and let’s see the business balloon, but no. That is too much for them to do. Twirling their fingers 24-7 is a better way to spend their important time.

I wish the Tech Support nabobs would look across the cityscape and say, let us over-support our customers. Let us pro-actively manage our network, let us tweak, look under the hood, test, re-test, simulate, and otherwise anticipate all possible tech problems. I wish they could say, let us quickly and firmly deal with any issue that escapes our attention and affects the customer, hence making them happy and productive. But no, that is too much. Twirling their fingers 24-7 is a better way to spend their important time.

You then wonder why our economy is stuck! The landing of the under sea FOC is not the end all be all, that is just humongous bandwidth to be hawked.

Service delivery is king! Just do it, KDN! Period.

Afripot – Africa’s melting pot!

Afripot.com is a web portal designed to bring together the North, South, East and West of Africa, and indeed the African Diaspora throughout the rest of the world, in a conglomeration of information, discussion and creative intercourse that aims at opening the doors to the further development of our beloved Africa.

Sovaya Broadband Internet

RE: Internet Broadband Service Offer.

Let me take this opportunity to introduce you to our Organization. Sovaya was established in 2004 as a Wireless Local Loop Operator. We are a Wireless broadband service provider that combines carrier-grade toughness with exceptional performance, security, ease-of-use, and scalability. More information on the company is available on request.

Sovaya provides multiple services such as high speed Internet, IP video surveillance, Voice over Internet Protocol, and network to homes and businesses over a fixed WiFi wireless broadband platform.

To achieve these Sovaya communication has adopted a wide range of products to complement established businesses and provide complex systems solutions to the IT world.
We have formed business alliance with major players in the IT industry and have trained personnel to meet the demands of our clients.

Our Product Offerings

Wireless Internet services
Surveillance IP cameras
E-mail services

1. Internet services

We offer wireless internet connectivity.

We do not charge;

installation fee or equipment cost

2. Surveillance cameras

We provide Sovaya IP solutions.

IP surveillance uses internet to transmit images to enable remote viewing and recording from anywhere in the world.

Other advantages include;

Remote accessibility
Easy future proof integration
Scalability and flexibility
Cost effectiveness

3. Email services

Email has become an integral part of everyday communication for both business and personal use. We offer the following services:

Domain registration
Domain transfers
Mail servers for corporate clients
Outlook configuration
Personal Sovaya email

4. Bandwidth
Our standard Service Offerings are in Shared Bandwidth.

Dedicated Bandwidth is available on request.

Service Offerings:

STANDARD BANDWIDTH OFFERS Monthly Charge
Pay per usage Kshs. 1 per/min
64 kbps uplink/160 kbps downlink Kshs. 4,002.00
128 kbps uplink/256 kbps downlink Kshs. 9,280.00
128 kbps uplink/386 kbps downlink Kshs. 14,442.00
256 kbps uplink/512 kbps downlink Kshs. 22,040.00
320 kbps uplink/700 kbps downlink Kshs. 29,000.00
512 kbps uplink/1 mb downlink Kshs. 40,600.00
1 mb kbps uplink/2 mb downlink Kshs. 72,268.00

DEDICATED BANDWIDTH OFFERS Monthly Charge
Pay per usage Kshs. 1 per/min
256 kbps uplink/256 kbps downlink Kshs. 18,560.00
512 kbps uplink/512 kbps downlink Kshs. 34,800.00
1 MB uplink/1MB downlink Kshs. 60,320.00
128 kbps uplink/256 kbps downlink Kshs. 91,640.00
kbps uplink/512 kbps downlink Kshs. 108,576.00

We can also custom tailor the service to specific demand.

We do not charge you any installation fee and we do not charge you for the equipment either.
All prices are inclusive of 16%vat.

Thanks.
Regards,

Tobias Otieno Obura

Sovaya Communications Ltd.

Mobile: 0721 992 457

tobias@sovaya.com

Vote for Your Kenyan ISP

Fellow Kenyans……….we are chronicling the build up of post fibre optic cable connections. We would like you to vote for your ISP below. This is more of a poll to see WHO is providing WHAT. So go ahead and vote. Also put your comments to enlighten us. Talk about sales service, connection, setup, configuration, after sales service, and the service delivery in general.

images images3 images4

Bring it out in the open, so that the ISPs can start waking up! Thanks in advance.

Broadband Kenya: Dr. Bitange Ndemo Cracks The Whip

Our beloved government has woken up and smelt the coffee. We need real broadband, not lofty adverts by ISPs about how “connected” they are and how many kilometres of fibre thay have laid in various places.

Information Permanent Secretary Dr Bitange Ndemo said on Tuesday that Internet Service Providers (ISPs) were still making obscene profits from the high cost of bandwidth despite the operationalisation of the fibre optic cables.

“They are being mischievous. We have been talking about $6000 per Megabyte, telling us that they are lowering to $600 which from our calculation their payback would be in less than six months that is not what we want,” he stressed.

It was widely believed that with the coming live of the SEACOM and The East African Marine System (TEAMS) cable, the cost of bandwidth would come down significantly but this has not happened.

Yes Daktari, read the riot act. We need real broadband connections, not advertising and endless “promotions” hoodwinking us to buy “bundles” and all manner of monthly contracts. When you get home, fire up your PC and connect, nothing. You actually miss your old dial-up line, at least it worked at a certain low speed, and you got what you expected.

“We have many options but it’s always good to leave the competition to push the pricing down, but it doesn’t the regulator (Communication Commission of Kenya), would step in,” the PS emphasised. Mr PS, please ensure the CCK steps in now.

Dr. Ndemo did not stop there, read on.

He said the argument that the providers have increased capacity for the same pricing is not valid since majority of Kenyans cannot access affordable and after internet connectivity.

“That is nonsense. If Kenyans are not able to afford, then I’m not happy because for me to ensure that the economy grows it is to make broadband available to Kenyans. But now it cannot be used, not many people have this in their homes,” he complained.

Yes Dr, we need to cut out this nonsense!

Moving on, we also need Kenyans to stop sitting on their laurels and do something about connecting themselves to the information superhighway, creating content and addding value to the body of knowledge. Being mere consumers of pre-packaged, pro-Western content is unhealthy.

That is my 2-cents worth, what is yours? Comment below.